BOOK REVIEW: With You Always by Jody Hedlund

BOOK REVIEW: With You Always by Jody Hedlund

My book review of Jody Hedlund’s title With You Always, Book 1 in her highly rated Orphan Train Series. This blog article includes connections to historically accurate events and elements used by Hedlund as a backdrop to this powerful Christian Historical Novel (Romance). 4.5 stars!

Victorian Fare: Yorkshire Pudding

Victorian Fare: Yorkshire Pudding

Today, October 13th, is National Yorkshire Pudding Day! The side dish comes to America’s melting pot from England, well before the Victorian era. I’ll share recipes from the 19th century American newspapers as well as my husband’s family’s modern recipe. Yum!

Vaseline: a Victorian Product?

Vaseline: a Victorian Product?

If you had to guess, would you suppose that petroleum jelly (specifically, Vaseline brand) was a nineteenth century “invention”? Too late? Too early? Pick a year, any year. Then open this article. Prepare to be amazed!

BOOK REVIEW: A Noble Groom by Jody Hedlund

BOOK REVIEW: A Noble Groom by Jody Hedlund

Five-star Book Review of Jody Hedlund’s A Noble Groom, with historical background, my personal reasons for rating this book so highly, and celebrating the historical accuracy in the setting and conflict of this superior Christian Historical Romance novel.

Would Frontiersmen Pool Resources for Potential Brides?

Would Frontiersmen Pool Resources for Potential Brides?

Would frontiersmen actually pool their financial resources to bring potential brides west? Would they trust one of their own to go East to find brides for them all? One county in Dakota Territory did just that in 1885. A California newspaper, The Petaluma Courier announced the plan.

The circumstances immediately brought to mind the premise behind my series, Prosperity’s Mail-Order Brides. Books 2 and 3 are in the queue (with titles!), and all have fancy new covers.

This Day in History: August 30

This Day in History: August 30

Two contrasting newspaper articles: August 30, 1860 (Altoona, PA) and August 30, 1876 (Fort Scott, KS), show both the apparently high fidelity of marriage…and the lowest of regard of the institution. Both–published on August 30th (157 years ago today, and 141 years ago today)–illustrate a slice of life from the mid- to late-Victorian Era United States. To amateur historians like me (and many readers of western historical romance fiction), newspaper articles like these allow us to draw conclusions based on the readings. What do you think of these two examples of marriage in 19th century America?