Victorian-American Headaches: Part 2

Victorian-American Headaches: Part 2

Part 2 of 11 in a Blog Article Series; May be read in any order. Links between each are provided for ease in reading.

Victorian-era American doctors faced the challenge of diagnosing headaches, relying upon intellect, experience, and deductive reasoning. After all, physicians couldn’t order a blood panel and read the results to assist in diagnostic work. This 1890 newspaper article contains a variety of types of headaches in 1890 language. I’ve provided translations where possible.

Victorian-American Headaches: Part 1

Victorian-American Headaches: Part 1

Victorian-Americans had several ideas about the common trouble of headaches– what caused the malady, what might help once a headache became entrenched, and perhaps why women suffer headaches differently than men.

Because I suffer from severe chronic headaches, I’ve often wondered what our Victorian-American ancestors did when they suffered a headache (migraine, tension headaches, etc.).  What was science’s answer in the late nineteenth century? With so much primary historical information to share, I’ve prepared an eleven-part blog article series covering this fascinating subject.

This is Part 1: Why I write about headaches in in the Victorian Era United States and why hats may be to blame.

Victorian Collars and Cuffs (for men)

Victorian Collars and Cuffs (for men)

In Victorian men’s fashion, Collars and Cuffs were something altogether separate and different than a shirt. A whole different paradigm, given today’s men’s dress shirts are one solid piece, with the collar and cuffs attached. See vintage images of the styles and reasons why tailors (and factory producers) bothered to make the collars separate–and why some were made of PAPER rather than fabric.

Why I Write Sweet Romance

Why I Write Sweet Romance

Somewhere along the way, authors determine what type of books they’ll write. What is their consistent category? What brings one person to write (and love) spicy romance while another writes (and loves) sweet romance?

I share my reasons for selecting Sweet Western Historical Romance (now more aptly categorized as Sweet American Historical Romance).