DIY Yeast in Victorian America

DIY Yeast in Victorian America

Nineteenth century breads often called for “a teacup of yeast,” a huge amount compared to today’s recipes. Victorian-era housekeepers (e.g. wives) made their yeast. And continued to whip up fresh batches of yeast (with a touch of the last batch as a starter) well after commercially prepared yeast waited on grocer’s shelves.

Victorian-American Headaches: Part 7

Victorian-American Headaches: Part 7

Beyond prescriptions (including “Doctor’s Own Patent Medicine” — we’ve seen a few of those in Part 4), what could osteopathic physicians and medical doctors do to alleviate their patients’ suffering from headache?

Victorian Tobacco: Cures or Kills?

Victorian Tobacco: Cures or Kills?

Did Victorian-era Americans partake of tobacco products with ignorant bliss? Or were they aware of health dangers? And were those health dangers remotely accurate (compared to today)?

Join me for a look at various newspaper articles, medical journal pieces, vintage photographs, and more. I’ll allow you to draw your own conclusions.

Victorian-American Wedding Anniversaries

Victorian-American Wedding Anniversaries

Victorian-American husbands and wives celebrated their wedding anniversaries in a variety of ways. The wealthy held sumptuous dinners and balls in honor of their years of wedded bliss and their guest lists and published itemized gifts showed it! A variety of late-nineteenth-century American etiquette governed much about the Victorian-American Wedding Anniversary, from invitation to gifts to entertainments.