Victorian Americans Observed Groundhog Day?

Victorian Americans Observed Groundhog Day?

Groundhog Day was adopted in the U.S. in 1887. Clymer H. Freas was the editor of the local paper Punxsutawney Spirit at the time, and he began promoting the town’s groundhog as the official “Groundhog Day meteorologist”. …The largest Groundhog Day celebration is held in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, with Punxsutawney Phil.

[Source:  Wikipedia]

The celebration began as a Pennsylvania German custom in southeastern and central Pennsylvania in the 18th and 19th centuries. It has its origins in ancient European weather lore, in which a badger or a sacred bear is the prognosticator, as opposed to a groundhog. It also bears similarities to the Pagan festival of Imbolc (the seasonal turning point of the Celtic calendar, which is celebrated on February 2 and also involves weather prognostication), and to St. Swithun‘s Day on July 15.

The first documented American reference to Groundhog Day can be found in a diary entry, dated February 4, 1841, by Morgantown, Pennsylvania, storekeeper James Morris:

Last Tuesday, the 2nd, was Candlemas day, the day on which, according to the Germans, the Groundhog peeps out of his winter quarters and if he sees his shadow he pops back for another six weeks nap, but if the day be cloudy he remains out, as the weather is to be moderate.

From England, the poem:

If Candlemas be fair and bright,
Winter has another flight.
If Candlemas brings clouds and rain,
Winter will not come again.

From Scotland, the poem:

If Candlemas Day is bright and clear,
There’ll be two winters in the year.

From Germany, the poem:

For as the sun shines on Candlemas Day,
So far will the snow swirl until May.
For as the snow blows on Candlemas Day,
So far will the sun shine before May.

[Source: Wikipedia]

Ground Hog’s Day. Cincinnati Daily Press of Cincinnati, Ohio, on February 5, 1862.

 

February 2 Groundhog Day

Ground-Hog’s Day, Part 1. White Cloud Kansas Chief of White Cloud, Kansas, on February 2, 1860.

Ground-Hog’s Day, Part 2. White Cloud Kansas Chief of White Cloud, Kansas, on February 2, 1860.

Ground-Hog’s Day, Part 3. White Cloud Kansas Chief of White Cloud, Kansas, on February 2, 1860.

Ground-Hog’s Day, Part 4. White Cloud Kansas Chief of White Cloud, Kansas, on February 2, 1860.

Ground-Hog’s Day, Part 5. White Cloud Kansas Chief of White Cloud, Kansas, on February 2, 1860.

Ground-Hog’s Day, Part 6. White Cloud Kansas Chief of White Cloud, Kansas on February 2, 1860.

Appeal to Spring. The Pittsburgh Press of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on February 25, 1895.

Do you watch Punxsutawney Phil on the news on February 2nd? Do you put much credence in the groundhog tradition?

If you’d lived in Victorian times, what might you have thought of this old world tradition?

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Articles about Victorian Observation of Holidays:

Victorian Americans and Mardi Gras A Child’s Benevolent Wish, Christmas 1883 Victorian Letters to Santa Victorian America Celebrates Halloween Victorian Americans Celebrate Oktoberfest Victorian America Celebrates Labor Day Pioneer Day: Utah’s Victorian History Victorian America Celebrates Independence Day Victorian America Observes Flag Day Victorian America Observes Memorial Day Victorian America Observes Mother’s Day–on Sweet Americana Sweethearts Victorian America Celebrates Arbor Day Victorian America Celebrates Easter Victorian America & April Fool’s Day–on Sweet Americana Sweethearts Victorian America Celebrates St. Patrick’s Day Victorian Leap Year Traditions, Part 1 Victorian Leap-Year Traditions, Part 2 Leap Into Love– The Victorian Way: Sweet Americana Sweethearts Victorian Era Valentine’s Day Victorian New Year Celebrations, on Sweet Americana Sweethearts A Victorian Menu for New Year’s Day, 1892 American Victorian Era Christmas Celebrations Victorian Era Thanksgiving Celebrations Happy Birthday, United States!

Copyright © 2017 Kristin Holt LC
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